Blog

dir_services.jpgOne of the things I like about MailStore is the simplicity with which local users can be managed, so I wanted to take a moment to provide you with an overview of the various options available to you in this area. Before I start, I should point out, that for each member of staff having their email archived, an account must be created in MailStore and a user licence allocated. One option is to create accounts manually within MailStore, entering the relevant information for each, which will typically include passwords, email addresses and access rights. This works perfectly well for smaller installations, but when dealing with more than a handful of user accounts it does start to make more sense to consider synchronising your MailStore user list with an external user directory service.

smartphones.pngAs MDaemon has evolved over the years there have been many different ways to setup syncronisation with mobile devices and with the the recent introduction of ActiveSync push email there is a new kid on the block but does this now make ActiveSync the best all in one method for email, calendar and contact syncronisation for all customers who can use it?
Read on to see our recommendations for each mobile platform and what advantages and disadvantages different methods have.

When I'm running MailStore webinars, I'm frequently asked about file groups and how they work. I've written this article to give you a good idea of how you can manage your existing file groups, how they can be moved around and what to do with those containing older email.

So what exactly is a file group?

ms-file-group.jpg

iscsi-icon.jpgHopefully you're already aware that one of the great new features coming in BackupAssist version 6.4 is the native support for iSCSI targets. This feature allows you to run Windows image jobs that fully support incremental updating and history. This is a great feature for disaster recovery backups as it negates the need to have local media (typically USB hard drives) attached to every server or workstation you want protected. I have covered the idea of iSCSI backups in this previous post, but as part of my help with the beta testing of BackupAssist I'm running some real world speed testing on my own Windows 7 box. The aim being to see how long backups will actually take in order to to get an idea of how often they can be run within the day to provide as up to date a backup as possible of the full system drive.

Over the past few years we've used a variety of different virtualisation tools but have historically always stuck to a mixture of either VMWare tools (esxi, Player and Workstation) or Microsoft’s Hyper-V platform. These have worked really well for building larger virtual server platforms but recently I was looking for a quick and easy to configure tool that I could use on my own desktop PC. I was just looking to build some simple test machines for evaluating software in a range of scenarios. After some browsing I came across Oracle VirtualBox and I must say I've been impressed with it so far.
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap